Tag Archives: athletics

Harlem Globetrotters and the Magnus effect

Just about everybody is interested in science these days and the Harlem Globetrotters (basketball team) are no exception,,

Here’s more about science and Harlem Globetrotters from an October 17, 2018 news release (received via email),

(Dallas, TX – Oct. 17, 2018) To prepare for their new world tour, the Harlem Globetrotters demonstrated acts of science at the “highest” level when Zeus McClurkin made two trick shots from the roof of the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in downtown Dallas.  Showing off the Magnus Effect, Zeus spun a basketball on his finger and shot a “curve ball” from nearly 200 feet up – hitting nothing but net in a hoop below.

The video was released today and is available via the hyperlinks below.  The footage and accompanying music are approved for media (courtesy Harlem Globetrotters).

Via YouTube

Via Facebook

As a two-time Guinness World Record holder, Zeus was joined by Cindy Hua, one of the “Brainiac” science educators from the Perot Museum.  Cindy took Zeus through the concept of the “Magus Effect” and how a spin of the ball will affect his shot.

The Globetrotters will bring their new Fan Powered World Tour to Dallas and Frisco over Thanksgiving Weekend.  The world famous team will play the Dr Pepper Arena on Friday, Nov. 23 at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.  Plus, two more games at American Airlines Center on Saturday, Nov. 24 a 1 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 25 at 2 p.m.  The full schedule of the Globetrotters’ games in Texas and around the world are available at HarlemGlobetrotters.com.

The top cultural attraction in Dallas/Fort Worth and a Michelin Green Guide three-star destination, the Perot Museum of Nature and Science is a nonprofit educational organization located in Victory Park in the heart of Dallas, Texas. With a mission to inspire minds through nature and science, the 180,000-square-foot Perot Museum delivers exciting, engaging and innovative experiences through its education, exhibit, global research and collections programming for children, students, teachers, families and life-long learners. To learn more, please visit perotmuseum.org.

For anyone who’s curious about the Magnus effect and its impact on ‘ball sports’, there’s this from its Wikipedia entry (Note: Links have been removed),

The most readily observable case of the Magnus effect is when a spinning sphere (or cylinder) curves away from the arc it would follow if it were not spinning. It is often used by soccer players, baseball pitchers and cricket bowlers. Consequently, the phenomenon is important in the study of the physics of many ball sports. It is also an important factor in the study of the effects of spinning on guided missiles—and has some engineering uses, for instance in the design of rotor ships and Flettner aeroplanes.

Frankly, I’m thrilled it never occurred to me that I’d ever have a chance to include the Harlem Globetrotters in any of my postings. Thank you to whomever dreamed up this piece of publicity.

Canadian fans will have a number of opportunities to see the Harlem Globetrotters in action on their world tour. Check it out here.

Finally,, I have not received any rewards (money or tickets or merchandise); quite simply, I love the Globetrotters for their expression of joyous athleticism.

The joys of an electronic ‘pill’: Could Canadian Olympic athletes’ training be hacked?

Lori Ewing (Canadian Press) in an  August 3, 2018 article on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation news website, heralds a new technology intended for the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo (Japan) but being tested now for the 2018 North American, Central American and Caribbean Athletics Association (NACAC) Track & Field Championships, known as Toronto 2018: Track & Field in the 6ix (Aug. 10-12, 2018) competition.

It’s described as a ‘computerized pill’ that will allow athletes to regulate their body temperature during competition or training workouts, from the August 3, 2018 article,

“We can take someone like Evan [Dunfee, a race walker], have him swallow the little pill, do a full four-hour workout, and then come back and download the whole thing, so we get from data core temperature every 30 seconds through that whole workout,” said Trent Stellingwerff, a sport scientist who works with Canada’s Olympic athletes.

“The two biggest factors of core temperature are obviously the outdoor humidex, heat and humidity, but also exercise intensity.”

Bluetooth technology allows Stellingwerff to gather immediate data with a handheld device — think a tricorder in “Star Trek.” The ingestible device also stores measurements for up to 16 hours when away from the monitor which can be wirelessly transmitted when back in range.

“That pill is going to change the way that we understand how the body responds to heat, because we just get so much information that wasn’t possible before,” Dunfee said. “Swallow a pill, after the race or after the training session, Trent will come up, and just hold the phone [emphasis mine] to your stomach and download all the information. It’s pretty crazy.”

First off, it’s probably not a pill or tablet but a gelcap and it sounds like the device is a wireless biosensor. As Ewing notes, the device collects data and transmits it.

Here’s how the French company, BodyCap, supplying the technology describes their product, from the company’s e-Celsius Performance webpage, (assuming this is the product being used),

Continuous core body temperature measurement

Main applications are:

Risk reduction for people in extreme situations, such as elite athletes. During exercise in a hot environment, thermal stress is amplified by the external temperature and the environment’s humidity. The saturation of the body’s thermoregulation mechanism can quickly cause hyperthermia to levels that may cause nausea, fainting or death.

Performance optimisation for elite athletes.This ingestible pill leaves the user fully mobile. The device keeps a continuous record of temperature during training session, competition and during the recovery phase. The data can then be used to correlate thermoregulation with performances. This enable the development of customised training protocols for each athlete.

e-Celsius Performance® can be used for all sports, including water sports. Its application is best suited to sports that are physically intensive like football, rugby, cycling, long distance running, tennis or those that take place in environments with extreme temperature conditions, like diving or skiing.

e-Celsius Performance®, is a miniaturised ingestible electronic pill that wirelessly transmits a continuous measurement of gastrointestinal temperature. [emphasis mine]

The data are stored on a monitor called e-Viewer Performance®. This device [emphases mine] shows alerts if the measurement is outside the desired range. The activation box is used to turn the pill on from standby mode and connect the e-Celsius Performance pill with the monitor for data collection in either real time or by recovery from the internal memory of e-Celsius Performance®. Each monitor can be used with up to three pills at once to enable extended use.

The monitor’s interface allows the user to download data to a PC/ Mac for storage. The pill is safe, non-invasive and easy to use, leaving the gastric system after one or two days, [emphasis mine] depending on individual transit time.

I found Dunfee’s description mildly confusing but that can be traced to his mention of wireless transmission to a phone. Ewing describes a handheld device which is consistent with the company’s product description. There is no mention of the potential for hacking but I would hope Athletics Canada and BodyCap are keeping up with current concerns over hacking and interference (e.g., Facebook/Cambridge Analytica, Russians and the 2016 US election, Roberto Rocha’s Aug. 3, 2018 article for CBC titled: Data sheds light on how Russian Twitter trolls targeted Canadians, etc.).

Moving on, this type of technology was first featured here in a February 11, 2014 posting (scroll down to the gif where an electronic circuit dissolves in water) and again in a November 23, 2015 posting about wearable and ingestible technologies but this is the first real life application I’ve seen for it.

Coincidentally, an August 2, 2018 Frontiers [Publishing] news release on EurekAlert announced this piece of research (published in June 2018) questioning whether we need this much data and whether these devices work as promoted,

Wearable [and, in the future, ingestible?] devices are increasingly bought to track and measure health and sports performance: [emphasis mine] from the number of steps walked each day to a person’s metabolic efficiency, from the quality of brain function to the quantity of oxygen inhaled while asleep. But the truth is we know very little about how well these sensors and machines work [emphasis mine]– let alone whether they deliver useful information, according to a new review published in Frontiers in Physiology.

“Despite the fact that we live in an era of ‘big data,’ we know surprisingly little about the suitability or effectiveness of these devices,” says lead author Dr Jonathan Peake of the School of Biomedical Sciences and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation at the Queensland University of Technology in Australia. “Only five percent of these devices have been formally validated.”

The authors reviewed information on devices used both by everyday people desiring to keep track of their physical and psychological health and by athletes training to achieve certain performance levels. [emphases mine] The devices — ranging from so-called wrist trackers to smart garments and body sensors [emphasis mine] designed to track our body’s vital signs and responses to stress and environmental influences — fall into six categories:

  • devices for monitoring hydration status and metabolism
  • devices, garments and mobile applications for monitoring physical and psychological stress
  • wearable devices that provide physical biofeedback (e.g., muscle stimulation, haptic feedback)
  • devices that provide cognitive feedback and training
  • devices and applications for monitoring and promoting sleep
  • devices and applications for evaluating concussion

The authors investigated key issues, such as: what the technology claims to do; whether the technology has been independently validated against some recognized standards; whether the technology is reliable and what, if any, calibration is needed; and finally, whether the item is commercially available or still under development.

The authors say that technology developed for research purposes generally seems to be more credible than devices created purely for commercial reasons.

“What is critical to understand here is that while most of these technologies are not labeled as ‘medical devices’ per se, their very existence, let alone the accompanying marketing, conveys a sensibility that they can be used to measure a standard of health,” says Peake. “There are ethical issues with this assumption that need to be addressed.” [emphases mine]

For example, self-diagnosis based on self-gathered data could be inconsistent with clinical analysis based on a medical professional’s assessment. And just as body mass index charts of the past really only provided general guidelines and didn’t take into account a person’s genetic predisposition or athletic build, today’s technology is similarly limited.

The authors are particularly concerned about those technologies that seek to confirm or correlate whether someone has sustained or recovered from a concussion, whether from sports or military service.

“We have to be very careful here because there is so much variability,” says Peake. “The technology could be quite useful, but it can’t and should never replace assessment by a trained medical professional.”

Speaking generally again now, Peake says it is important to establish whether using wearable devices affects people’s knowledge and attitude about their own health and whether paying such close attention to our bodies could in fact create a harmful obsession with personal health, either for individuals using the devices, or for family members. Still, self-monitoring may reveal undiagnosed health problems, said Peake, although population data is more likely to point to false positives.

“What we do know is that we need to start studying these devices and the trends they are creating,” says Peake. “This is a booming industry.”

In fact, a March 2018 study by P&S Market Research indicates the wearable market is expected to generate $48.2 billion in revenue by 2023. That’s a mere five years into the future.”

The authors highlight a number of areas for investigation in order to develop reasonable consumer policies around this growing industry. These include how rigorously the device/technology has been evaluated and the strength of evidence that the device/technology actually produces the desired outcomes.

“And I’ll add a final question: Is wearing a device that continuously tracks your body’s actions, your brain activity, and your metabolic function — then wirelessly transmits that data to either a cloud-based databank or some other storage — safe, for users? Will it help us improve our health?” asked Peake. “We need to ask these questions and research the answers.”

The authors were not examining ingestible biosensors nor were they examining any issues related to data about core temperatures but it would seem that some of the same issues could apply especially if and when this technology is brought to the consumer market.

Here’s a link to the and a citation for the paper,

Critical Review of Consumer Wearables, Mobile Applications, and Equipment for Providing Biofeedback, Monitoring Stress, and Sleep in Physically Active Populations by Jonathan M. Peake, Graham Kerr, and John P. Sullivan. Front. Physiol., 28 June 2018 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.00743

This paper is open access.

MMA (mixed martial arts) and nano silver wound dressings

I had never, ever expected to mention mixed martial arts (MMA) here but that’s one of the delightful aspects of writing about nanotechnology; you never know where it will take you. A March 9, 2015 news item on Azonano describes the wound situation for athletes and a new product,

..

As an MMA Champion athlete, Rich Franklin knows all too well about germs and how easily they spread. During training he dealt with them on a regular basis, but it wasn’t until the first time he had staph, did he realize these infections could cost him a victory. Now, working in a global setting, Franklin trains in locations around the world which leaves him exposed to a plethora of bacteria and fungi. So he teamed up with American Biotech Labs (ABL) to develop Armor Gel, nano silver-based, wound dressing gel that can stay active on the skin for up to seventy-two hours (3 days). Using patented nano silver technology, Armor Gel has been scientifically tested to reduce the levels of bacteria and other pathogens, while forming a protective barrier “armor” over the wound. By shielding the body from external bacterial, the body’s natural healing process can be expedited. Its use is recommended by doctors, trainers, coaches, and athletes alike.

A March 6, 2015 ABL news release on BusinessWire, which originated the news item, provides a little more detail about Armor Gel,

Engineered for today’s modern athletes, Armor Gel is safe, nontoxic and provides a personal first line of defense. Already proven to reduce the levels of MRSA, VRE, pseudomonas aeruginosa, E. coli, A. niger and Candida albicans, Armor Gel is formulated using a unique and patented 24 SilverSol Technology®.

American Biotech Labs (ABL) was started in 2002 as a nano silver biotech company with the goal of creating a more stable and powerful silver technology for consumer products. …

I am providing a link to the product website (neither the link nor this post are endorsements), you can find out more about Armor Gel here.

Armor Gel was announced previously in a Sept. 16, 2014 ABL news release on PR Newswire, At the time no mention was made of Rich Franklin, their MMA athlete,

American Biotech Labs, LLC, is pleased to announce the availability of three new silver hydrogel wound-dressing products.  The new products will allow American Biotech Labs (ABL) to market in the wound-care market focusing on ultimate sports and fitness, spa and health, and animal markets.

The new over-the-counter (OTC) products will have wound-dressing claims for minor cuts, lacerations, abrasions, 1st and 2nd degree burns, and skin irritations.  The products also have pathogen-inhibiting barrier claims against pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, MRSA and VRE, as well as fungi, such as Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger.  These new gels can provide a barrier that will help protect wounds for 24 to 72 hours.

The new products will be found under the names of Armor Gel™ (for the ultimate sports and fitness market), ASAP OTC™ (for the spa and health markets), and ASAP Pet Shield® (for the animal market).

Along with the release of these new products, ABL has formed a strategic alliance with Stuart Evey, founder and former chairman of ESPN, and Gary Bernstein, marketing executive and professional photographer and film maker.  ABL will utilize these talented individuals to help introduce these revolutionary new products to high-profile organizations in sports, pet stores, fashion and beauty, medical, and direct-marketing areas, etc.

Said Keith Moeller, ABL Director, “We are very grateful to the numerous top scientists, labs and universities that have helped move this amazing, patented, silver technology forward.  We believe that these products have the ability to impact the future of wound management worldwide.”

Note: Any statements released by American Biotech Labs, LLC that are forward looking are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.  Editors and investors are cautioned that forward looking statements invoke risk and uncertainties that may affect the company’s business prospects and performance.

You can find out more about ABL and its entire product line here.

Female triathlete from Iran and a nanotechnology solution to water repellent gear

The style is a bit breathless, i.e., a high level of hype with very little about the technology, but it features an interesting partnership in the world of sport and a nanotechnology-enabled product (from an Oct. 7, 2014 news item on Azonano; Note: A link has been removed),

Shirin Gerami’s story is one which will go down in history. Shirin is the first Iranian female to represent her country in a triathlon and is paving the way for setting gender equality both in Iran and across the world.

In order to race for Iran, it was essential that Shirin respected the rules of her country, and raced in clothes that covered her body and hair. It was necessary to design clothes those both adhered to these conditions, whilst ensuring her performance was not affected.

An Oct. 7, 2014 P2i press release, which originated the news item, goes on to describe it role in Shirin Gerami athletic career,

Previously, waterproof fabrics Shirin had tried were uncomfortable, lacked breathability and slowed down her performance. Shirin contacted P2i upon hearing of the liquid repellent qualities of our patented nano-technology. Our nano-technology, a thousand times thinner than a human hair, has no effect on the look or feel of a product. This means we can achieve the highest levels of water repellency without affecting the quality of a fabric. A P2i coating on the kit meant it was water repellent whilst remaining highly breathable and light – essential when trying to remain as streamlined as possible!

Here’s a picture of Gerami wearing her new gear at a recently held triathlete event held in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada,

[downloaded from http://www.p2i.com/news/articles/P2i_and_Shirin_Gerami_A_partnership_changing_history]

[downloaded from http://www.p2i.com/news/articles/P2i_and_Shirin_Gerami_A_partnership_changing_history]

The press release describes her first experience with her P2i-enabled running gear (Note: A link has been removed),

Shirin only received approval for her race kit from the Iranian government days before the race, so it was quite literally a race to the starting line. Consequently, Shirin did not have time to test the P2i coated kit before she began the World Triathlon Grand Final in Edmonton, Canada. Shirin explains, ‘I cannot tell you how relieved and happy I am that the coating worked exactly as I hoped it would. It was bone dry when I took my wetsuit off!’

I believe Gerami is using the term ‘wetsuit’ as a way of identifying the kit’s skintight properties similar to the ‘wetsuits’ that divers wear.

The press release concludes (Note: A link has been removed),

You can find out more about UK-based P2i on its website. I was not able to find more information about its products designed for use in sports gear but was able to find a May 11, 2012 press release about its partnership with UK Sport.

As for the Aug. 25 – Sept. 1, 2014 TransCanada Corp. World Triathlon Grand Final where Gerami tested her suit, you can find out more about the event here (scroll down).

Coffee-powered athletic gear, courtesy ASICS

Describing the upcoming collection (2015) of athletic gear from ASICS as coffee-powered is a bit of an exaggeration but at least some of the new gear is derived from coffee beans according to a Sept. 22, 2014 news item on Yahoo Philippines news,

A workout fueled by caffeine, but not in the way you’d guess: Highlights of Asics’ newly announced collection include the patented new textile technology Ecoline, made of repurposed coffee beans which makes for a moisture wicking, breathable polyester.

The entire Sept. 18, 2014 ASICS America press release, available on a Reuters website, which originated the news item, provides more details,

… Exciting standout introductions this season include “ECOLINE®,” a new technology from ASICS utilizing recycled polyester fabric from repurposed coffee beans with sweat-wicking and climate-control benefits, and the new GEL-FujiRunnegade™ running footwear with an anti-gravel tongue to prevent debris from getting into the footwear during off-road runs. No matter the level of competitor or athlete, consumers will find the Spring 2015 collection an unmatched companion in their training, practice, and competition.

The press release doesn’t offer any more details about the repurposed coffee bean-based athletic wear but there is a reference to socks designed with NanoGLIDE® technology which have sweat-wicking and climate control benefits,

… Favorites of ASICS elite tennis athletes like Sam Stosur and Gael Monfils also appear in the collection, including the GEL-Solution® Speed 2, voted “Best Game Day Shoe” by Tennis Magazine, the ASICS Team Performance apparel line and the Resolution™ sock designed for court play with NanoGLIDE®1 technology.

The NanoGLIDE company produces textiles for athletic garments. Here is a bit more information about the socks and the technology from the company’s FAQs (frequently asked questions) page,

Is this technology permanent or a finish?

NanoGLIDE® technology is permanent because it is incorporated into the yarn or fiber from the very beginning of the polyester or nylon fiber manufacturing process. The benefits of the technology will be retained or improved over the life of the garment or sock. Unlike topical finishes, or nano chemistry which are added in the dye bath during fabric finishing or in the wash cycle when socks are laundered before shipping; NanoGLIDE® will not wash off or wear out.

What are the benefits of NanoGLIDE® technology when used in apparel and socks?

There is a large demand for performance fabrics and socks that provide multiple benefits in one product. To date, these performance features have largely been obtained through finishing fabrics or washing socks with various chemical additives.

In some cases, there are multiple finishing stages which end up costing additional dollars and sacrificing hand /aesthetics/performance and time. NanoGLIDE® fiber/fabrics were developed to provide multiple attributes (Hand-Loft-Softness-Evaporative Cooling/Moister Management-UV Protection-Friction-Abrasion-Heat Management) that are permanently in the fiber and will not wash out.

Getting back to ASICS and its Ecoline technology, there was an Aug. 2, 2013 press release on Global Newswire.com featuring Ecoline and a coconut-based technology,

Designed for the adventurous trail explorer who demands durable and sustainable clothing to match the elements, a revolutionary addition to the spring 2014 collection is the new Ecoline® fabric with Cocona®1 Technology, which uses natural active particles derived from coconuts and minerals to enhance the performance of the fabrics by increasing breathability, odor management and UV protection.

Whether or not those are nanoparticles being derived from the coconut and minerals is not revealed.