Tag Archives: automotive industry

The Innovation Society’s Nanorama Car Workshop

Thanks to a Sept. 23, 2014 news item on Nanowerk, I’ve come across this education initiative for workers in the automotive industry,

Nanomaterials and ultra-fine particles in car workshops – learn how to handle them safely by exploring the “Nanorama Car Workshop”, which is now available (in German) at http://nano.dguv.de/nanorama/bghm/. A “Nanorama” is a virtual classroom that allows its users to gather important information on safe handling of nanomaterials in a 360° work environment.

The emphasis of the “Nanorama Car Workshop” is on the handling of products containing nanomaterials and on work processes that can lead to the formation of ultra-fine particles. In the “Nanorama Car Workshop”, the user receives useful information about hazard evaluation assessment, the occupational exposure to nanomaterials and necessary protective measures.

An Aug. 25, 2014 DGUV (Deutsche Gesetzliche Unfallversicherung; German Social Accident Insurance Institution) press release, (summary available here) provides more details,

The ‘Nanorama Lab’ (http://nano.dguv.de/nanorama/bgrci/) represents the second interactive educational tool on the Nano-Platform ‘Safe Handling of Nanomaterials’ (http://nano.dguv.de) (both currently only available in German). They were developed by the Innovation Society, St. Gallen, in close collaboration with the German Social Accident Insurance Institution for the raw materials and chemical industry (BG RCI). The ‘Nanorama Lab’ offers in-depth insights into the safe handling of nanomaterials and installations used to manufacture or process nanomaterials in laboratories. Complementary to hazard evaluation assessments, it enables users to assess the occupational exposure to nanomaterials and to identify necessary protective measures when handling said materials in laboratories.

«Due to the attractive visual implementation and the interactive contents, the ‘Nanorama Lab’ offers a great introduction to protective measures in laboratories », says Dr. Thomas H. Brock, Head of the Expert Committee on Hazardous Substances of the BG RCI. The ‘Nanorama Lab’ inspires curiosity in users and instigates them to reflect on the conditions in their respective workplaces. «By exploring the ‘Nanorama Lab’, laboratory staff actively deals with occupational health and safety in laboratories and its practical implementation with regard to nanomaterials.»

The press release goes on to describe the ‘nanorama’ concept,

Presenting the ‘Nanorama Lab’, the DGUV again harnesses the interactive E-Learning tool ‘Nanorama’ developed by The Innovation Society, St. Gallen. A ‘Nanorama’ – a lexical blend of ‘Nano’ and ‘Panorama’, – is a novel 360°-E-learning module in which the user enters a virtual space and moves around in it. By completing a ‘Nanorama’, users acquire knowledge in an entertaining manner. ‘Nanoramas’ can be applied in many areas of education and communication.

The first module of the Nano-Platform, the ‘Nanorama Construction’, can be visited on http://nano.dguv.de/nanorama/bgbau/. It offers insights into the use and applications of nanomaterials in the construction industry and will soon be followed by the ‘Nanorama
Metal’. Additionally, the Nano-Platform c an be expanded with further ‘Nanorama’-modules on any given sector or trade thanks to its modular design.

There is no word as to when an English-language version may be available but you can visit the Nanomara car workshop, regardless.

You can also check out the Nano-Portal for more information about this car Nanorama and other such inititiatives.

Here’s an image from the Nanorama car workshop,

Nanorama car workshop [downloaded from http://nano.dguv.de/]

Nanorama car workshop [downloaded from http://nano.dguv.de/]

Automotive plastics that never wear out

Nanovere is a coatings company that makes big promises according to the Jan. 2, 2013 news item on Nanowerk,

Imagine for a moment a world were automotive plastics never fade, a self-cleaning wheel that resists brake dust, a self-cleaning tire that looks new for life, or a fiberglass boat that resists fading for life. These and other amazing benefits are now possible due to 10 years of research & development in nanotechnology.

According to Nanovere Technologies Chairman & Chief Technology Officer Thomas Choate, “Nanovere is pleased to introduce the world’s first Wipe-On clear nanocoating to exceed automotive OEM specifications. The product is named Vecdor Nano-Clear®. What’s most unique about Nano-Clear® is the ability to permanently restore original color, gloss and surface hardness back into oxidized textured plastics, highly oxidized fiberglass and highly oxidized paint surfaces while reducing surface maintenance by 60%.”

…  Nanovere Technologies has pioneered proprietary 3D nanostructured coatings at the molecular level since 2003. Nano-Clear® forms a “highly crosslink dense film with extreme scratch resistance, chemical resistance, UV resistance, remarkable flexibility and self-cleaning properties including water, oil, ice and brake-dust repellency.”

(For those who are interested, there are more specifics about this wonder coating in the news item.)

In reading this I was reminded of a movie that I saw years ago, an Alec Guinness film, The Man in The White Suit. Here’s the synoposis from imdb.com,

An altruistic chemist invents a fabric that resists wear and stain as boon to humanity but both capital and labor realize it must be suppressed for economic reasons.

A very funny film released in 1951 it offers a trenchant commentary on why some problems are better left unsolved.