The body as an electronic device—adding electronics to biological tissue

What makes this particular combination of electronic s  and living tissue special is t that it was achieved in 3-D rather than 2-D.  From the Boston Children’s Hospital Aug. 26, 2012 news release on EurekAlert,

A multi-institutional research team has developed a method for embedding networks of biocompatible nanoscale wires within engineered tissues. These networks—which mark the first time that electronics and tissue have been truly merged in 3D—allow direct tissue sensing and potentially stimulation, a potential boon for development of engineered tissues that incorporate capabilities for monitoring and stimulation, and of devices for screening new drugs.

The Aug. 27, 2012 news item on Nanowerk provides more detail about integration of the cells and electronics,

Until now, the only cellular platforms that incorporated electronic sensors consisted of flat layers of cells grown on planar metal electrodes or transistors. Those two-dimensional systems do not accurately replicate natural tissue, so the research team set out to design a 3-D scaffold that could monitor electrical activity, allowing them to see how cells inside the structure would respond to specific drugs.

The researchers built their new scaffold out of epoxy, a nontoxic material that can take on a porous, 3-D structure. Silicon nanowires embedded in the scaffold carry electrical signals to and from cells grown within the structure.

“The scaffold is not just a mechanical support for cells, it contains multiple sensors. We seed cells into the scaffold and eventually it becomes a 3-D engineered tissue,” Tian says [Bozhi Tian, a former postdoc at MIT {Massachusetts Institute of Technology} and Children’s Hospital and a lead author of the paper ].

The team chose silicon nanowires for electronic sensors because they are small, stable, can be safely implanted into living tissue and are more electrically sensitive than metal electrodes. The nanowires, which range in diameter from 30 to 80 nanometers (about 1,000 times smaller than a human hair), can detect voltages less than one-thousandth of a watt, which is the level of electricity that might be seen in a cell.

Here’s more about why the researchers want to integrate living tissue and electronics, from the Harvard University Aug. 26, 2012 news release on EurekAlert,

“The current methods we have for monitoring or interacting with living systems are limited,” said Lieber [Charles M. Lieber, the Mark Hyman, Jr. Professor of Chemistry at Harvard and one of the study’s team leaders]. “We can use electrodes to measure activity in cells or tissue, but that damages them. With this technology, for the first time, we can work at the same scale as the unit of biological system without interrupting it. Ultimately, this is about merging tissue with electronics in a way that it becomes difficult to determine where the tissue ends and the electronics begin.”

The research addresses a concern that has long been associated with work on bioengineered tissue – how to create systems capable of sensing chemical or electrical changes in the tissue after it has been grown and implanted. The system might also represent a solution to researchers’ struggles in developing methods to directly stimulate engineered tissues and measure cellular reactions.

“In the body, the autonomic nervous system keeps track of pH, chemistry, oxygen and other factors, and triggers responses as needed,” Kohane [Daniel Kohane, a Harvard Medical School professor in the Department of Anesthesia at Children’s Hospital Boston and a team leader] explained. “We need to be able to mimic the kind of intrinsic feedback loops the body has evolved in order to maintain fine control at the cellular and tissue level.”

Here’s a citation and a link to the paper (which is behind a paywall),

Macroporous nanowire nanoelectronic scaffolds for synthetic tissues by Bozhi Tian, Jia Lin, Tal Dvir, Lihua Jin, Jonathan H. Tsui, Quan  Qing, Zhigang Suo, Robert Langer, Daniel S. Kohane, and Charles M. Lieber in Nature Materials (2012) doi:10.1038/nmat3404 Published onlin26 August 2012.

This is the image MIT included with its Aug 27, 2012 news release (which originated the news item on Nanowerk),

A 3-D reconstructed confocal fluorescence micrograph of a tissue scaffold.
Image: Charles M. Lieber and Daniel S. Kohane.

At this point they’re discussing therapeutic possibilities but I expect that ‘enhancement’ is also being considered although not mentioned for public consumption.

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  1. Pingback: Medicine, nanoelectronics, social implications, and figuring it all out « FrogHeart

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