Tag Archives: 13th Canadian Science Policy Conference

Call for papers for the 13th (2021) Canadian Science Policy Conference (CSPC)

“Building Forward Better” (sigh) is the concept for the upcoming 2021 Canadian Science Policy Conference. (I wish the theme didn’t seem derivative of “Build Back Better,” President Joe Biden’s agenda.) The deadline as it stands now is May 21, 2021 for the panel proposals and, I believe, the short talk proposals.

As usual, the conference is being held in Ottawa, which is convenient when most government science policy wonks are in Ottawa, of course, the rest of us can ‘Zoom’ attend.

Note: CSPC is the abbreviation for both the Canadian Science Policy Centre and the Canadian Science Policy Conference, which the Centre organizes. Confusing, eh? conference.

From the 2021 CSPC call for submissions webpage (Note formatting changes),

CSPC [Canadian Science Policy Centre] is excited to announce the themes and topics for the 13th Canadian Science Policy Conference!

As Canada focuses on the future and post-pandemic rebuilding process, the overarching message of CSPC 2021 is shaped by the concept of Building Forward Better.

PANEL DEADLINE MAY 21ST

There is no fee associated with the panel submission.

Theme 1:  Science and Policy

STI Policy frameworks

Towards holistic STI policies: Approaches that are inclusive of governments, agencies, private sector, academe

Beyond the Endless Frontier; Renegotiating the Social Contract between Science, Innovation, and Society 

The international research ecosystem/supply chain – opportunities and risks  

Policy and regulation of emerging technologies 

Indigenous knowledge:

Integration in evidence-informed decision making

Climate change:

Carbon management goals: Issues and approaches for agriculture, forestry, food production, manufacturing, and land use 

Agriculture: Production, sustainability, and life cycle; precision agriculture

Biodiversity and conservation

Indigenous communities’ engagement in managing and adapting to climate change   

Smart cities and smart infrastructure 

Theme 2: Science and Society

Public engagement

Responses to the science of COVID-19 – lessons learned

Misinformation/Disinformation 

Public trust in science, especially in the post pandemic world

Digital media

Democracy and politics in a ‘post-trust’ / ‘post-truth’ / post-pandemic era

Science and Post Pandemic Politics, Platforms and Elections 

Theme 3:  Science, Innovation and Economic Development

International

Best Global practices in commercializing new knowledge from scientific research 

Priority Sectors/Challenges 

Sustainable development and the circular resource economy 

What should be Canada’s competitive priority: Technology innovation or technology adoption? 

Assessing the impact of Disruptive Technologies on Canada’s Job Growth and Economic Development 

Theme 4:  Science and International Affairs and Security

Security of Research and Innovation:

State and non-state espionage

Cyber, and data security

International Collaboration and Security

Science diplomacy in post pandemic era

International STI developments: Implications for Canada:  

American Science Policy

Horizon Europe 

International science and technology agreements 

Social Media, international regulations, and citizen rights International knowledge and talent strategy, brain circulation

Science and Technology in an increasingly tense global order

Theme 5: Science and the Next Generation

New graduates and new realities 

Capacity building:

The next generation of Indigenous leaders

The next generation of innovative tech leaders, e.g. space, AI, cybersecurity cleantech

Indigenous led research by Indigenous for Indigenous 

Theme 6:  Grand Challenges 

Canada’s energy policies for a sustainable future

Food security 

Climate change

Climate Adaptation

Next steps to Net Zero 

Water scarcity and quality 

Oceans and sea rise 

As I’ve noted elsewhere (and frequently), much of the science policy discussion coming out of Ottawa via these conferences and the Council of Canadian Academies is Eurocentric and UScentric as can be seen in Theme 4’s International STI developments: Implications for Canada., which highlights these three topics: American Science Policy, Horizon Europe, and International science and technology agreements. No mention of China? Perhaps it will be found here in submissions for Science and Technology in an increasingly tense global order. Finally and surprisingly, there’s no mention of the Arctic in the Grand Challenges’ Climate change subgroups or elsewhere.

I have some more details from the 2021 CSPC’s Criteria for proposal selection webpage,

CSPC is a national forum, a mosaic which aims to have a balanced representation of regional, sectoral, and topical diversity; as well as to provide under-represented groups an opportunity to present their ideas. These criteria will also be factored in for the final selection of panels.

There are two streams for proposal submission this year. Please read the criteria for each stream carefully before finalizing your submission. Both streams are expected to adhere to the CSPC 2021 themes and topics to increase chances of acceptance. 

1. Panel proposals 

80 minute panels (50 minute presentation, 20-30 minutes of questions) where a diverse, multisectoral group discuss topics in science policy (see CSPC 2021 themes and topics)

2. Short talk proposals.

10 minute presentations for those individuals who do not have the means to organize a panel, in particular student and early career professionals.

Good luck!