Tag Archives: pain relief

Needle-free tattoos, smart and otherwise

Before getting to the research news from the University of Twente (Netherlands), there’s this related event which took place on April 18, 2019 (from the Future Under Our Skin webpage (on the University of Twente website) Note: I have made some formatting changes,

Why this event?

Our skin can give information about our health, mood and surroundings. Medical and recreational tattoos have decorated humans for centuries. But we can inject other materials besides ink, such as sensing devices, nano- or bio-responsive materials. With the increased percentage of tattooed population in recent years new health challenges have emerged; but is also a unique possibility to “read from our own skin”, beyond an artistic design. 
 
We have invited scientists, innovators, entrepreneurs, dermatologists, cosmetic permanent make-up technicians, tattoo artists, philosophers, and other experts. They will share with us their vision of the current and future role our skin has for improving the quality of life.

Open Event

This event is open to students, citizens in general as well as societal and governmental organisations around the different uses of our skin. The presence of scientists, medical doctors, tattoo artists and industry representatives is guaranteed. Then, we will all explore together the potential for co-creation with healthy citizens, patients, entreprises and other stakeholders.


If you want to hear from experts and share your own ideas, feel free to come to this Open Event!
 
It is possible to take the dish of the day (‘goed gevulde noedels met kippendij en satésaus en kroepoek’) in restaurant The Gallery (same building as DesignLab) at own costs (€7,85). Of course it is also possible to eat à la carte in Grand Café 

Wanneer: : 18 april 2019
Tijd: :17:30 – 20:00
Organisator: University of Twente
Locatie: Design Lab University of Twente
Hengelosestraat 500
7521 AN Enschede

Just days before, the University of Twente announced this research in an April 16, 2019 news item on Naowerk (Note: A link has been removed),

A tattoo that is warning you for too many hours of sunlight exposure, or is alerting you for taking your medication? Next to their cosmetic role, tattoos could get new functionality using intelligent ink. That would require more precise and less invasive injection technique.

Researchers of the University of Twente now develop a micro-jet injection technology that doesn’t use needles at all. Instead, an ultrafast liquid jet with the thickness of a human hair penetrates the skin. It isn’t painful and there is less waste.

In their new publication in the American Journal of Physics (“High speed imaging of solid needle and liquid micro-jet injections”), the scientists compare both the needle and the fluid jet approach.

Here’s an image provided by the researchers which illustrates the technique they have developed,

Working principle of needle-free injection: laser heating the fluid.The growing bubble pushes out the fluid (medicine or ink) at very high speed. Courtesy: University of Twente

An April 15, 2019 University of Twente press release, which originated the news item, provides more detail about tattoos and the research leading to ‘need-free’ tattoos,

Ötzi the Iceman already had, over 5000 years ago, dozens of simple tattoos on his body, apparently for pain relief. Since the classic ‘anchor’ tattoo that sailors had on their arms, tattoos have become more and more common. About 44 million Europeans wear one or more of them. Despite its wider acceptance in society, the underlying technique didn’t change and still has health risks. One or more moving needles put ink underneath the skin surface. This is painful and can damage the skin. Apart from that, needles have to be disposed of in a responsible way, and quite some ink is wasted. The alternative that David Fernández Rivas and his colleagues are developing, doesn’t use any needles. In their new paper, they compare this new approach with classic needle technology, on an artificial skin material and using high speed images. Remarkably, according to Fernández Rivas, the classic needle technology has never been subject of research in such a thorough way, using high speed images.

Fast fluid jet

The new technique employs a laser for rapidly heating a fluid that is inside a microchannel on a glass chip. Heated above the boiling point, a vapour bubble forms and grows, pushing the liquid out at speeds up to 100 meter per second (360 km/h). The jet, about the diameter of a human hair, is capable of going through human skin. “You don’t feel much of it, no more than a mosquito bite”, say Fernandez Rivas.

The researchers did their experiments with a number of commercially available inks. Compared to a tattoo machine, the micro-jet consumes a small amount of energy. What’s more important, it minimizes skin damage and the injection efficiency is much higher, there is no loss of fluids. And there is no risk of contaminated needles. The current microjet is a single one, while tattooing is often done using multiple needles with different types or colours of ink. Also, the volume that can be ‘delivered’ by the microjet has to be increased. These are next steps in developing the needle-free technology.

Skin treatment

In today’s medical world, tattoo-resembling techniques are used for treatment of skin, masking scars, or treating hair diseases. These are other areas in which the new technique can be used, as well as in vaccination. A challenging idea is using tattoos for cosmetic purposes and as health sensors at the same time. What if ink is light-sensitive or responds to certain substances that are present in the skin or in sweat?

On this new approach, scientists, students, entrepreneurs and tattoo artists join a special event ‘The future under our skin’, organized by David Fernandez Rivas.

Research has been done in the Mesoscale Chemical Systems group, part of UT’s MESA+ Institute.

Here’s a link to an d a citation for the paper,

High speed imaging of solid needle and liquid micro-jet injections by Loreto Oyarte Gálveza, Maria Brió Pérez, and David Fernández Rivas. Journal of Applied Physics 125, 144504 (2019); Volume 125, Issue 14 DOI: 10.1063/1.5074176 https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5074176 Free Published Online: 09 April 2019

This paper appears to be open access.

Opioid addiction and nanotechnology in Pennsylvania, US

Combating a drug addiction ‘crisis’ with a nanotechnology-enabled solution is the main topic although the technology is being implemented for another problem first according to this May 4, 2016 article by John Luciew for pennlive.com (Note: Links have been removed),

Treating pain is a constant in medicine. It’s part of the human condition, known as the “fifth vital sign” among physicians. Effectively treating pain will continue to play a central role in medicine, despite the societal shock waves brought on by the rapid rise in opioid addiction across America.

The fallout from our nation’s opioid addiction crisis is roiling the medical and pharmaceutical industries, where regulatory action is rapidly reining in opioid painkiller prescriptions with new guidelines and stricter controls.

By harnessing nanotechnology and small-particles physics, Iroko Pharmaceuticals is developing a new class of low-dose prescription painkillers. Company executives say their line of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs could be the opioid alternative that the medical community has been looking for amid America’s addiction crisis.

The pharmaceutical company is Pennsylvania-based (US) and it isn’t tackling the ‘opioid addiction crisis’ yet. First, there’s this,

Its new line of prescription painkillers are predicated upon a highly patented process of pulverizing drug molecules so they are up to 100 times smaller, which markedly increases their pain-killing effectiveness at dramatically lower doses.

Right now, Iroko is focusing this nanotechnology on creating a full line of low-dose prescription painkillers based upon the class of drugs known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, or NSAIDs. There are six NSAID molecules, the most common being Ibuprofen. Iroko is planning nanotechnology technology versions for all six NSAID molecules, three of which have already received approval from the Food and Drug Administration.

Luciew has done some homework on the technology,

“We solved a chemistry problem by using physics,” explained Iroko Chairman Osagie Imasogie, who founded the company [Iroko Pharmaceuticals] in 2007.

Yet, the company that actually solved the physics problem was iCeutica, founded in Australia and now based in King of Prussia, Pa.

iCeutica owns the patented SoluMatrix fine particle process that pulverizes drug molecules into nano-sized particles, enabling low doses of a drug to be better absorbed by the body, thus providing faster and far more effective pain relief.

Of course, the practice of crushing and grinding drug powders is as old as the pharmacist’s mortar and pestle. But there’s never been a way of pulverizing a drug molecule into nano particles that was scalable for industrial production — not until iCeutica created its SoluMatrix process, that is.

iCeutica provides a description of the technology on its SoluMatrix webpage,

iCeutica’s proprietary SoluMatrix™ Fine Particle Technology fuels new product development and solves problems of bioavailability, variability, side effects and delivery of marketed or development-stage pharmaceuticals.

The SoluMatrix technology is a scaleable and cost-effective manufacturing process that can produce submicron-sized drug particles that are 10 to 200 times smaller than conventional drug particles. The particles generated using this technology, which both grinds the drug particles into a superfine powder and protects those submicron particles from subsequent agglomeration (or clumping together into big particles), comprise a single unit operation and can be manufactured into tablets, capsules and other dosage forms without further processing.

The SoluMatrix technology improves the performance of pharmaceuticals by dramatically changing how the drug dissolves and is absorbed. By making submicron-sized particles of a drug, it is possible to:

Unfortunately there aren’t more details. I’m somewhat puzzled  by the submicron measurement why not state the size using the term nanometre?

Getting back  to Iroko, Imasogie, impressed with the SoluMatrix technology, has made a major investment in iCeutica and is chair of iCeutica’s board. His homebase company, Iroko holds exclusive global rights to SoluMatrix.

Luciew’s article describes the current situation in the NSAID market,

Iroko officials acknowledge that NSAID painkillers carry their own health risks, including the potential for stomach ulcers, kidney problems and cardio-vascular ailments, up to and including stroke and heart attack. The fears associated with NSAIDs peaked a decade ago with the Vioxx case, a popular prescription NSAID that was eventually taken off the market due to associated cardiac and other risks.

The latest FDA guidelines for NSAID use calls for the lowest effective dose, which precisely describes the nanotechnology-driven low-dose NSAID drugs Iroko is rolling out. What is more, due to the ongoing opioid crisis, both the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control are heavily emphasizing non-opioid alternatives for pain relief, further opening to door for Iroko’s pain products.

That said about the issues with NSAIDs, Luciew outlines Iroko’s current offerings and explains what makes this technology so attractive,

According to Imasogie, Iroko’s line of low-dose, nanotechnology NSAIDs fits both sets of regulatory safety criteria. The new drugs are the lowest effective dose for NSAIDs, and are a viable pain-killing alternative to opioids, especially when it comes to treating osteoarthritis and other moderate pain.

“No one is going to give an NSAID if you have cancer,” Imasogie says. “But for chronic low back pain, yes.”

Three of Iroko’s six low-dose NSAID offerings have already received FDA approval and are on the market:

  • Zorvolex (diclofenac), approved in October 2013 for the management of mild to moderate acute pain in adults and in August 2014 for the management of osteoarthritis pain.
  • Tivorbex, approved in February 2014 for treatment of mild to moderate acute pain in adults.
  • Vivlodex, approved in October 2015 as another option for treatment of osteoarthritis pain. Three more of Iroko’s low-dose NSAIDs are awaiting approval.

These nano drugs are effective at doses of 35 to 40 milligrams to as low as 10 milligrams, the company says. That’s compared to other NSAID doses that start at 200 milligrams. As a result, Iroko’s low-dose NSAID drugs are being marketed as providing a prescription alternative to opioids at the precise moment everyone from the White House to the white-coat-clad family physician is searching for one.

If you the have time and interest, I encourage you to read Luciew’s article in its entirety. He covers more market issues and includes an enbedded video in his piece.

One last note about Iroko Pharmaceuticals, the company is named after a tree found on the African continent and executives of the company have hinted they are experimenting with SoluMatrix to make low-dose opioids available in the future.

While I have my doubts about the opioid addiction ‘crisis’, I do believe that lower, more effective doses of painkillers, regardless of their drug class, can only benefit patients.