Tag Archives: SFU Café Scientifique

“How genome research is influencing our understanding of B-cell lymphomas” at Simon Fraser University (SFU) Café Scientifique on November 25, 2021 from 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm PST

This is from a November 8, 2021 SFU Café Scientifique notice (received via email),

We are excited to announce our next virtual SFU Café Scientifique!

NOW OPEN FOR REGISTRATION

Thursday November 25, 2021  5:00-6:30pm

Dr. Ryan Morin, SFU Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry

“How genome research is influencing our understanding of B-cell lymphomas”

Zoom invites will be sent to those registered, closer to the date.

Register here:

https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/how-genome-research-is-influencing-our-understanding-of-b-cell-lymphomas-tickets-203977471107

We hope to see you then!

There’s a little more of a topic description on the event registration webpage,

Every cancer arises following the accumulation of genetic changes known as mutations. Dr. Ryan Morin will discuss how genomics can allow us to understand how specific mutations influence the onset of lymphoma (and other common cancers) and can lead to new and more effective therapies.

There’s a little more detail about Morin’s work on his profile page on the BC Cancer Research Institute website,

Dr. Ryan Morin has been studying the genetic nature of lymphoid cancers using genomic methods for more than a decade. During his doctoral training at the University of British Columbia and BC Cancer, he pioneered the use of transcriptome and whole genome sequencing to identify driver mutations in non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Over the course of his training, he published a series of papers describing some of the most common genetic features of diffuse large B-cell (DLBCL) and follicular lymphomas including EZH2, KMT2D, CREBBP and MEF2B. Following his transition to an independent position at SFU, Dr. Morin has continued to identify genetic features of these and other aggressive lymphomas including non-coding (silent) regulatory drivers of cancer. His laboratory has implemented novel assays for the sensitive detection and genetic characterization of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA). These “liquid biopsy” approaches continue to be developed as non-invasive methods for monitoring treatment response and resistance. Using these and other modern genomics tools and bioinformatics techniques, his team continues to explore the genetics of relapsed and refractory DLBCL with an ultimate goal of identifying novel biomarkers that predict treatment failure on specific therapies. This work has helped refine our understanding of genetic and gene expression differences that predict poor outcome in DLBCL.

Hopefully, Morin will be talking about the liquid biopsies and other non-invasive methods he and his team use in their work.