Tag Archives: University of Regina

Truth and Reconciliation Day Sept. 30, 2021

Years ago I came across a newspaper article where the writer had interviewed some Chiefs. I can’t remember what occasioned the article but the quotes about land rights could have been taken from one of today’s newspapers. The article was written in 1925.

In hearing the stories of what Indigenous Peoples in Canada have had to endure such as the loss of their land and rights, horrific living conditions on the reserves, the Residential schools, and more, our failure to act is impossible to understand.

The perseverance over generations is remarkable.

For anyone who may want to find out more about why there is a Truth and Reconciliation Day there is a September 28, 2021 article (Why Canada is marking the 1st National Day for Truth and Reconciliation this year) by Michelle Ghoussoub for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) news online. The Canadian federal government has this National Day for Truth and Reconciliation webpage, which provides information about events being held across the country. APTN (once called Aboriginal Peoples Television Network) lists a special 24 hour schedule on their National Day for Truth and Reconciliation webpage.

I’d like to end on a note of hope and given that this is a science blog, these two endeavours stand out.

First Nations University

Here’s more from the About Us webpage,

First Nations University of Canada seeks to have an ongoing transformative impact through education based on a foundation of Indigenous Knowledge. The Regina campus is situated on the atim kâ-mihkosit (Red Dog) Urban Reserve, Star Blanket Cree Nation and Treaty 4 Territory. Star Blanket is the first First Nation in Canada to create an urban reserve specifically dedicated to the advancement of education.

They offer undergraduate and graduate programmes and appear to have some sort of partnership with the University of Regina (Saskatchewan). Their Indigenous Knowledge & Science undergraduate programme description can be found here.

Indigenous science, technology, and society (Indigenous STS)

I have two different webspaces for this. First, the Indigenous Science, Technology, and Society webpage on the University of Alberta, Faculty of Native Studies,

About Indigenous STS

Indigenous Science, Technology, and Society (Indigenous STS) is an international research and teaching hub, housed at the University of Alberta, for the burgeoning sub-field of Indigenous STS.

Our mission is two-fold: 1) To build Indigenous scientific literacy by training graduate students, postdoctoral, and community fellows to grapple expertly with techno-scientific projects and topics that affect their territories, peoples, economies, and institutions; and 2) To produce research and public intellectual outputs with the goal to inform national, global, and Indigenous thought and policymaking related to science and technology. Indigenous STS is committed to building and supporting techno-scientific projects and ways of thinking that promote Indigenous self-determination.

Learn more about Indigenous STS.

Principal Investigator

Kim TallBear

Kim TallBear is an Associate Professor, Faculty of Native Studies, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment, University of Alberta, and a 2018 Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Fellow. She is a graduate of the University of California, Santa Cruz and of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Professor TallBear is the author of one monograph, Native American DNA: Tribal Belonging and the False Promise of Genetic Science (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2013), which won the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association First Book Prize. She is the co-editor of a collection of essays published by the Oak Lake Writers, a Dakota and Lakota tribal writers’ society in the USA. Professor TallBear has written nearly two-dozen academic articles and chapters published in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Sweden. She also writes for the popular press and has published in venues such as BuzzFeed, Indian Country Today, and GeneWatch. She is a frequent blogger on issues related to Indigenous peoples, science, and technology. Professor TallBear is a frequent commentator in the media on issues related to Indigenous peoples and genomics including interviews in New Scientist, New York Times, Native America Calling, National Geographic, Scientific American, The Atlantic, and on NPR, CBC News and BBC World Service. Professor TallBear has advised science museums across the United States on issues related to race and science. She also advised the former President of the American Society for Human Genetics on issues related to genetic research ethics with Indigenous populations. She is a founding ethics faculty member in the Summer internship for Indigenous Peoples in Genomics (SING), and has served as an advisor to programs at genome ethics centres at Duke University and Stanford University. She is also an advisory board member of the Science & Justice Research Centre at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Professor TallBear was an elected council member of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) from 2010-2013. She is co-producer of an Edmonton sexy storytelling show, Tipi Confessions, which serves as a research-creation laboratory at the University of Alberta on issues related to decolonization and Indigenous sexualities. She is a citizen of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate in South Dakota and is also descended from the Cheyenne & Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma.

Learn more about Kim TallBear

You may have already discovered the second webspace, it’s the Indigenous Science, Technology, and Society (Indigenous STS) website. There are other programmes but the one that most interested me is the Summer Internship for Indigenous Peoples in Genomics Canada (SING Canada),

About

The Summer internship for INdigenous peoples in Genomics Canada (SING Canada) is an initiative associated with the Indigenous Science, Technology, and Society Research and Training Program (Indigenous STS) at the University of Alberta, Faculty of Native Studies. Building on the success of SING US and SING AotearoaSING Canada is an annual one-week intensive workshop designed to build Indigenous capacity and scientific literacy by training undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral, and community fellows in the basic of genomics, bioinformatics, and Indigenous and decolonial bioethics. This week-long, all expenses paid residential program invites Indigenous participants to engage in hands-on classroom, lab, and field training in genomic sciences and Indigenous knowledge. The curriculum includes an introduction to leading advances in and Indigenous approaches to genomics and its the ethical, environmental, economic, legal, and social (GE3LS) implications. Participants gain an awareness of the uses, misuses, opportunities, and limitations of genomics as a tool for Indigenous peoples’ governance. SING Canada is distinguished by its dedication to critical Indigenous theory and an emphasis on discussing the local contexts (i.e. political, legal, biological, and Indigenous) where the workshops take place, including the human and other-than-human relations that have implications variously for human and non-human health, environments, and societies. This is not your average summer science training program!

Sponsors

Our SING Canada regular sponsors include the University of Alberta Faculty of Native Studies, Genome CanadaSilent Genomes and LifeLabs.

SING Canada seems to have originated in 2018 and one was planned for 2021. I imagine they’ll update the information when they prepare for the 2022 edition.